Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12
  1. #1
    New Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    US
    Age
    18
    Posts
    5
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Default Anyone have any practicing tips

    I'm a 17 year old guitarist and I'm looking for some advice I'll take anything

    Sent from my Moto G (5) Plus using Tapatalk

  2. #2
    BluesTalk Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Korat, Thailand
    Posts
    88
    Thanks
    10
    Thanked 37 Times in 29 Posts

    Default

    Some good guitar lessons on YouTube. Just type in BLUES GUITAR LESSONS in the search box. Good luck.
    Rdrokit Power channel, rock/blues & roadhouse music.
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCc4...9lEgoWa39iqEgA

  3. #3
    BluesTalker
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    146
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 22 Times in 18 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by phaynes4648 View Post
    I'm a 17 year old guitarist and I'm looking for some advice I'll take anything

    Sent from my Moto G (5) Plus using Tapatalk
    Welcome to the Forum! How far along are you in your playing? Do you know the fingerboard notes, open chords, barre chords, major and minor scales, music theory, etc, etc. It would help to know where you are.
    Marky

    Remember the music is not in the guitar

  4. #4
    BluesTalk Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    40
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 8 Times in 7 Posts

    Default

    use a metronome. practice scales and sequences, but only play them as fast as you can play them PRECISELY. then, when you can play something clean and accurately without messing up, speed it up and do it over. you may have to play something 1000 times.
    learn some theory.....if anyone tells you that learning theory will ruin your creativity, they are full of crap.
    learn arpeggios and chords.
    learn what harmonized scales are.(harmonized scales are chords within a key) which leads me to this......
    learn the pattern for chords in the major and minor keys. (I ii iii IV V vi vii major, and i ii III iv v VI VII minor)
    I'll have my drink in hand and just give cold stares at my guitar from across the room and say out loud, "this could be you in my hand but you wanted to suck so now you just sit over there and think about that for awhile".---------sam_in_cali

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to heltershelton For This Useful Post:

    SashaS (04-28-2018)

  6. #5
    BluesTalker
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    146
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 22 Times in 18 Posts

    Default

    I agree with heltershelton but here are a few things you might consider:

    These are common questions. What should I practice? How should I practice? What do I work on next? How do I get out of this rut? Why am I not improving? What am I doing? If you live in this questioning state for too long, you may end up getting quite discouraged and start to resent playing because it’s always the same story. You might seek advice from other guitar players (like us) or instructors, and eventually, you’ll give up unless you start to understand one crucial fact. Unless you have goals and work to accomplish them, making progress with your instrument will be difficult.

    Start by creating meaningful practice times. Be encouraged; it is completely possible to always be improving your skills and making music.

    It is important that we are all very honest with ourselves about our playing. We all get caught up in gear, tone, taking in resources on the internet, entertainment and it can be difficult to take a good look at our playing with a practical set of eyes.

    There’s a few questions that indicate if someone has taken the time to set real, achievable goals. How do I practice? What should I work on next? When should I move on? How do I get out of a rut? Ask yourself.

    Why did you decide to play the guitar?
    What do you want to do with your guitar playing?
    Long term vs short term goals.
    Changing perspective on goals.
    Accountability.
    Setting and meeting deadlines.

    Being mindful of the different ways you can approach your regular practicing will help keep things interesting and fulfilling. A lot of players get stuck in the “drills” mindset and forget about all the wonderful ways there are to develop your playing. There are different kinds of practicing like:

    Focusing on technique.
    Conceptual practicing.
    Creative practicing.

    I think recording is one of the main tools that is going to foster improvement on the guitar. You’re going to see and hear real life examples of how recording can immediately help you refine and reflect on your playing. You’ll look specifically at how to think about recording from a practicing perspective. Try doing these things:

    Revisit Different Types of Practicing: Technique, Conceptual, Creative*
    React as a Listener
    Like an Honest Mirror
    Ways to Use Practicing

    Recording yourself is also a great way to measure your progress try:

    Working with tempo, no track
    Working with drum loops
    Working with backing tracks
    Making your own simple tracks

    You can use basic recording techniques to continually evaluate and spur on your creativity while you practice. Hone in specifically on these areas:

    *Creativity
    Focus on phrasing
    Layering simple parts
    Pocket
    Basic arranging

    When you start regularly reflecting on your playing, you’ll start to notice a lot of things you like and plenty that you don’t like. You’ll listen back and want to immediately fix or revisit certain ideas to refine them and make them sound more complete or natural. This act of listening, making a judgement on your playing and then fixing or enhancing based on what you hear is absolutely a form of practicing. It’s a branch of practicing creativity and you’ll see and hear practical examples of how this works:

    Piecing together ideas: solo excerpt
    The composing mindset
    Making conversation

    Remember, these are just my opinions, others here can add lots more, I'm sure.

    Most of all, HAVE FUN!
    Marky

    Remember the music is not in the guitar

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to Marky Forrest For This Useful Post:

    phaynes4648 (05-12-2018)

  8. #6
    New Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    US
    Age
    18
    Posts
    5
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Marky Forrest View Post
    Welcome to the Forum! How far along are you in your playing? Do you know the fingerboard notes, open chords, barre chords, major and minor scales, music theory, etc, etc. It would help to know where you are.
    I know a lot actually
    I can do barre chords I can play a basic blues with the l lV and V chords of a given progression
    I'm very well adversed in the minor scale and major I know all the positions by heart
    Open chords are nothing chord changes are easy
    I just want some tips for intermediate playing

    Sent from my Moto G (5) Plus using Tapatalk

  9. #7
    New Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    US
    Age
    18
    Posts
    5
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Marky Forrest View Post
    I agree with heltershelton but here are a few things you might consider:

    These are common questions. What should I practice? How should I practice? What do I work on next? How do I get out of this rut? Why am I not improving? What am I doing? If you live in this questioning state for too long, you may end up getting quite discouraged and start to resent playing because it’s always the same story. You might seek advice from other guitar players (like us) or instructors, and eventually, you’ll give up unless you start to understand one crucial fact. Unless you have goals and work to accomplish them, making progress with your instrument will be difficult.

    Start by creating meaningful practice times. Be encouraged; it is completely possible to always be improving your skills and making music.

    It is important that we are all very honest with ourselves about our playing. We all get caught up in gear, tone, taking in resources on the internet, entertainment and it can be difficult to take a good look at our playing with a practical set of eyes.

    There’s a few questions that indicate if someone has taken the time to set real, achievable goals. How do I practice? What should I work on next? When should I move on? How do I get out of a rut? Ask yourself.

    Why did you decide to play the guitar?
    What do you want to do with your guitar playing?
    Long term vs short term goals.
    Changing perspective on goals.
    Accountability.
    Setting and meeting deadlines.

    Being mindful of the different ways you can approach your regular practicing will help keep things interesting and fulfilling. A lot of players get stuck in the “drills” mindset and forget about all the wonderful ways there are to develop your playing. There are different kinds of practicing like:

    Focusing on technique.
    Conceptual practicing.
    Creative practicing.

    I think recording is one of the main tools that is going to foster improvement on the guitar. You’re going to see and hear real life examples of how recording can immediately help you refine and reflect on your playing. You’ll look specifically at how to think about recording from a practicing perspective. Try doing these things:

    Revisit Different Types of Practicing: Technique, Conceptual, Creative*
    React as a Listener
    Like an Honest Mirror
    Ways to Use Practicing

    Recording yourself is also a great way to measure your progress try:

    Working with tempo, no track
    Working with drum loops
    Working with backing tracks
    Making your own simple tracks

    You can use basic recording techniques to continually evaluate and spur on your creativity while you practice. Hone in specifically on these areas:

    *Creativity
    Focus on phrasing
    Layering simple parts
    Pocket
    Basic arranging

    When you start regularly reflecting on your playing, you’ll start to notice a lot of things you like and plenty that you don’t like. You’ll listen back and want to immediately fix or revisit certain ideas to refine them and make them sound more complete or natural. This act of listening, making a judgement on your playing and then fixing or enhancing based on what you hear is absolutely a form of practicing. It’s a branch of practicing creativity and you’ll see and hear practical examples of how this works:

    Piecing together ideas: solo excerpt
    The composing mindset
    Making conversation

    Remember, these are just my opinions, others here can add lots more, I'm sure.

    Most of all, HAVE FUN!
    You're advance is good I like it

    I'm working on my phrasing and the vocabulary I use when playing a blues solo

    I'm a lead guitarist in a band that isn't a traditional blues but I am always interjecting bluesy ideas into the mix because in my mind I feel like the most honest guitar playing is the blues it feels genuine when done right I feels like it's you telling someone a little bit about yourself and where you are right now when you play that solo

    I always connected with it enough so to pick up the guitar
    It was always the blues that drew me in

    Sent from my Moto G (5) Plus using Tapatalk

  10. #8
    BluesTalker
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    146
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 22 Times in 18 Posts

    Default

    Keep playing it with your heart, young brother, and you will be just fine.
    Marky

    Remember the music is not in the guitar

  11. The Following User Says Thank You to Marky Forrest For This Useful Post:

    phaynes4648 (05-15-2018)

  12. #9
    BluesTalk Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    40
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 8 Times in 7 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by phaynes4648 View Post
    I know a lot actually
    I can do barre chords I can play a basic blues with the l lV and V chords of a given progression
    I'm very well adversed in the minor scale and major I know all the positions by heart
    Open chords are nothing chord changes are easy
    I just want some tips for intermediate playing

    Sent from my Moto G (5) Plus using Tapatalk
    do you really know alot?
    i think youre going to find that the more you know, the more there is to know. it never ends. thats whats cool about music. why dont you post a vid of yourself playing to a backing track so we can see exactly where youre at. that would make it much easier for us to give advice. alot of us have guitars older than you, and probably older than your parents, lol.
    I'll have my drink in hand and just give cold stares at my guitar from across the room and say out loud, "this could be you in my hand but you wanted to suck so now you just sit over there and think about that for awhile".---------sam_in_cali

  13. The Following User Says Thank You to heltershelton For This Useful Post:

    phaynes4648 (05-14-2018)

  14. #10
    BluesTalker
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    London, England
    Posts
    318
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 47 Times in 38 Posts

    Default

    My tuppence worth.....

    play everyday, even if it just for 5 minutes. Picking up the instrument every day is everything. With that idea in mind, learn something new every day.

    If you sit through a YouTube lesson...you don't have to learn all of it, cherry pick that one lick or phrase that means something to you.

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:55 PM.
vBulletin 4.0 skin by CompleteVB