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  1. #71
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    It was Alexis that got me into blues. I used to listen to him on BBC Radio 1, must have been early / mid 70's ?

  2. #72
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    Just finished 'Hand me my travelin shoes' by Michael Gray.
    It's the biography of Blind Willie McTell. Fastinating book, not only on Willies' life but also especially interesting for me as a non - American, lots of stuff on Civil War and slavery / segregation which gives a good background and also gives some idea of the workings of the early recording industry and the pioniers that travelled the country 'discovering' the old players.
    Great read not just as a music book. It also as an extensive list of his recordings including a lot that been remastered on cd.

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    BluesHawk (02-26-2014)

  4. #73
    More Blues
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    Default Babe Kyro Lemon Turner aka "The Black Ace"

    I just stumbled on to this fantastic vid and thought i'd do a little research. Here's what i know so far...



    (from the National Guitar website)http://www.nationalguitars.com/admin/history.html

    The trademarks of Ace's style were carefully thought out lyrics and structures supported by guitar work that was simpler than the Hawaiian style, and closer to bottleneck slide Blues. However, the smooth tone he got with his style 2 Tricone was a sharp contrast to the harsher tone of the Delta.

    Black Ace found more opportunities as the Depression began to ease in the mid-1930s, and he began to tour as far as Louisiana and Oklahoma. He settled in Ft. Worth, Texas, and it was there a talent scout for Decca Records signed him to a contract. This resulted in six sides, including the song that gave him his professional name, "I Am The Black Ace."

    Vocalion also recorded him, but only issued two sides under a different name, Buck Turner. Ace also did frequent radio performances between 1936 and 1941, and even appeared in the 1937 film, "The Blood of Jesus," as a performer."

    World War II interrupted his career in 1943. After his term, he didn't return to music, and he and his wife were picking cotton for a living. In 1950, he was working as a janitor at the Ft. Worth Airport.

    In 1960, he was re-discovered by Chris Strachwitz, and he recorded an album for Arhoolie Records. Also in 1962, he appeared in another film, "The Blues." That was the last of his music until he passed away in Ft. Worth in 1972.

    Black Ace remains one of the more obscure artists in the Blues, yet his music is still esteemed by fans of slide guitar. In Texas, he is still being re-discovered by new generations of Blues slide fans who seek out artists like Ace, Hop Wilson, and others who played guitar in the Hawaiian style.

  5. #74
    BluesLover
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    Default The Guitar King

    Quote Originally Posted by homeboy View Post
    ...Here's what i know so far... (from the National Guitar website) http://www.nationalguitars.com/admin/history.html ...a talent scout for Decca Records signed (Babe Kyro Lemon Turner aka "The Black Ace") to a contract...
    In the 1960s John Hammond was playing "Guitar King" by Black Ace Turner. His version impressed me so much that I learned slide guitar and eventually bought a National identical to Hammond's. But Black Ace Turner was obscure, and there was no internet, so I'm really glad to be learning more about him now.

    (BTW, I'm gonna rummage around my collection cos I think I have the DVD of "The Blood of Jesus". If you haven't seen it, wow, you would eat it right up. I'll also do a YouTube search for it.)

    Thanks, Scott!

    Doug

  6. #75
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    Great stuff, Jim! Thank you so much for this; Henry Thomas is one of my favourites!
    "When you've got a good friend"

  7. #76
    BluesLover
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    Quote Originally Posted by homeboy View Post
    I just stumbled on to this fantastic vid and thought i'd do a little research. Here's what i know so far...



    (from the National Guitar website)http://www.nationalguitars.com/admin/history.html

    The trademarks of Ace's style were carefully thought out lyrics and structures supported by guitar work that was simpler than the Hawaiian style, and closer to bottleneck slide Blues. However, the smooth tone he got with his style 2 Tricone was a sharp contrast to the harsher tone of the Delta.

    Black Ace found more opportunities as the Depression began to ease in the mid-1930s, and he began to tour as far as Louisiana and Oklahoma. He settled in Ft. Worth, Texas, and it was there a talent scout for Decca Records signed him to a contract. This resulted in six sides, including the song that gave him his professional name, "I Am The Black Ace."

    Vocalion also recorded him, but only issued two sides under a different name, Buck Turner. Ace also did frequent radio performances between 1936 and 1941, and even appeared in the 1937 film, "The Blood of Jesus," as a performer."

    World War II interrupted his career in 1943. After his term, he didn't return to music, and he and his wife were picking cotton for a living. In 1950, he was working as a janitor at the Ft. Worth Airport.

    In 1960, he was re-discovered by Chris Strachwitz, and he recorded an album for Arhoolie Records. Also in 1962, he appeared in another film, "The Blues." That was the last of his music until he passed away in Ft. Worth in 1972.

    Black Ace remains one of the more obscure artists in the Blues, yet his music is still esteemed by fans of slide guitar. In Texas, he is still being re-discovered by new generations of Blues slide fans who seek out artists like Ace, Hop Wilson, and others who played guitar in the Hawaiian style.
    Here's the classic film in which Black Ace plays slide, and there's a cameo shot of him on the back of a trailer truck playin his Spanish style guitar lap slide. Watch the entire film for the nuanced history...sneaking the erotic stuff in on the pretense it's a moralistic message about what not to look at or do...

    https://youtu.be/N0QZZ2r3e7s

 

 

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